Waiting for Spring

Waiting for Spring

Disclaimer: we are in the middle of wonderful spring weather here in Western Washington this week.

I took this self-portrait years ago… we were hiking up the Sol Duc valley and coming back through the camping area we saw this picnic table surrounded by a icy puddle. I thought it looked sad … and decided to accentuate that mood with a gloomy look. I walked into the puddle from the back to avoid disturbing the surface of the puddle in the foreground … placed my sitting pad (I’m not crazy enough to sit in wet snow when I don’t have to) and got the photo.

Snow On Cedar

Snow on Cedar

Western Red Cedar to be specific. It is the native cedar along the Pacific Coast, until you get into Alaska where it tends to be replaced with some Yellow Cedar. Yellow cedar is a favorite of carvers. The name Incense Cedar is apt and the smell of the wood is wonderful. You can find it in Washington in the high country right on the edge of tree line.

Winter Walk

Battlements in Winter
Memory Vault Archway

Even a dusting of snow changes the impact of an image. The bright foreground is different than the non-winter image, where the brightest area is often the sky at the top of an image. These are from Fort Worden State Park in Port Townsend, WA.

Winter Madrone

Winter Madrone I
Winter Madrone II

I like Pacific Madrone a lot for their colors. (they aren’t so much a favorite if they are growing in my yard: they are quite messy all year round) But with a dusting of snow, the color really stands out.

Frosty Snowy Branches

Frosty Snowy Branches

This was along the Highway outside of Haines, Alaska. There had been just a dusting of snow, then it cleared off and some heavy frost locked the snow in place. This is along the river valley, so these are poplars, alders and such. The river meanders across the valley, favoring quick growing varieties of tree. No 400 year old cedars growing along there.

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