Winter Walk

Battlements in Winter
Memory Vault Archway

Even a dusting of snow changes the impact of an image. The bright foreground is different than the non-winter image, where the brightest area is often the sky at the top of an image. These are from Fort Worden State Park in Port Townsend, WA.

Winter Madrone

Winter Madrone I
Winter Madrone II

I like Pacific Madrone a lot for their colors. (they aren’t so much a favorite if they are growing in my yard: they are quite messy all year round) But with a dusting of snow, the color really stands out.

Points of Port Townsend

Point Wilson Lighthouse

The top image is the Point Wilson Lighthouse at Fort Worden State Park in Port Townsend, WA. The angle makes it look less like a point. The main body of Puget Sound (Admiralty Inlet) is just on the other side of the lighthouse. The hillside in the distance is on Whidbey Island.

Point Hudson from Fort Worden

Point Hudson is at the NE corner of Port Townsend, right at the end of Water Street. This was taken from up on the hill at Fort Worden just prior to the image above. You can walk the beach from one point to the other … just make sure to check the tide charts before you start!

Beach Walk

Beach Walk with Dog
Seagull at Water’s Edge

I was at Fort Worden State Park recently. There had been some snow the day before, but it was mostly gone (you can still see some left in the driftwood in the top image). I liked the water in the bottom photo and the splashes frozen in time.

The Lillian River Trail

The Lillian River Trail
Madrone on the Lillian River Trail

The Lillian River trail is one of the most seldom hiked trails in the Olympic National Park. Starting about the 4 mile point on the Elwha River Trail, the route follows the Lillian River for several miles until it just peters in the brush along the bank. It was originally used for fishing and might be again some day, now that the dams have been removed from the Elwha River.

It was quite brushy … and I expect the route is increasingly difficult to find, given the light usage. The lower photo of the madrone is difficult to scale appropriately to show the size of this specimen. It was a beautiful tree. I would like to go back and visit to see how it has weathered the years.

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