Biking up the Dose

The Dosewallips Car Camp

Recently my friend Gary and I rode our eBikes up the Dosewallips Road past the washouts and up to the Dosewallips Campground … a distance of about 6.5 miles (each way). We had great weather and were just doing a day trip … although regular readers may note that another friend and I have made several trips up the road backpacking.

I carried my camera and the day was a great success, based on how much fun we had. During the bouncy ride, I lost my lens cap, but that’s why they sell extras, isn’t it?

Dosewallips Rapids/Falls
The Dosewallips Road (above the washout)
Un-named stream with a small falls

More Pinhole Photography

Abandoned Building at Fort Worden State Park
Madrone Hanging over the Roadway

My last post had a description of the pinhole lens I bought and the process. I thought i would share a couple more images that show the dreamy look that is typical of pinhole cameras better than the more general landscape shots.

Digital Pinhole

Ferry Departure, Port Townsend
Fort Worden Overlook

I recently bought a pin hole lens for my Nikon D850. It has a variety of sizes of pinholes with a ring to rotate to switch between them. (see below for a look at the lens/camera) The pinhole concept predates photography … going back for its roots to the camera obscura. One of the interesting features of pinhole photography is that the depth of field is “infinite”…. everything is ‘in focus’. Of course, the focus isn’t as sharp as one gets with a lens camera and high resolution sensor (or film). Longer exposure times are required… since the size of the opening is so small. You are effectively using a very large “f-stop”. Therefore, a tripod is necessary. The top image of the ferry is a 5 second exposure, for instance.

I had a couple of different pinhole cameras that I had made in the past. One was an assignment for my high school photography class. These days you can buy various pinhole cameras … and spend up to several hundred dollars … some are very nicely made wood boxes. With those, you use either sheet film or photo paper and then have to deal with the development, etc. Since I don’t have a darkroom, I opted for trying out the pinhole lens that was designed with the Nikon F-mount.

Because the pinhole leaves the camera interior open to the environment (even if the opening is very small), I opted to put on a UV lens just as a method of keeping out dust. What I found afterwards is that the ‘infinite depth of field’ of the pinhole means that all the dust particles on the filter are also in focus (or nearly so). Interesting learning process! So, if you look carefully at the enlarged image, you will notice all the specks of dust in the sky areas.

Nikon with pinhole lens

Stuck

Stuck with the bridge open for boat traffic
Bridge Supports

One of the drawbacks to living where I do is that it’s a long way from major shopping areas with a bridge to cross. When the bridge opens for boat traffic, it can create a huge traffic backup… especially on holiday weekends. But when the weather is nice and you have nothing else to do, it can be an interesting photo op.

Fort Worden State Park

Overlook of Fort Worden main complex
Bunker
Rusted Door

Fort Worden State Park in Port Townsend, Washington is one of my favorite locations for walking, biking and for taking photographs. The old bunkers have been left to the weather, and the weather has worked it’s magic to make the heavy metal doors into visually appealing artifacts. A good use for an abandon Fort that overlooks the entrance to Puget Sound … and that never fired a shot (except in practice).

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