Mountain View Through Fall Colors

Mountain View Through Fall Colors

The mountain in the distance is a part of the Mt Jupiter ridge (but not the summit), which runs between the Dosewallips and Duckabush rivers in the Olympic Mountains. I was hiking up the Dosewallips when I caught this opening through the trees giving a view of the high country. The higher ridges were already showing some signs of snowfall.

Trillium

Trillium

Trillium are a member of the lily family and are fairly common in Western Washington at all elevations, except for alpine environs. They occasionally are included in gardens, although they can be difficult to get started. My father was able to get a small patch growing in our yard years ago. I saw my first one of the spring a couple weeks ago.

Spring Wildflowers: Yellow Faun Lily

Yellow Faun Lily

When I first looked at this image, I thought it was a twin flowered stem. But it is two separate plants with close alignment. This was taken up near the top of Mt Rose in the SE corner of the Olympic Mountains … outside the Olympic National Park.

Fog Coming In

Fog Coming In

This photo was taken on my way up Mt Ellinor (see the previous post) on a day when the weather was deteriorating rapidly. It was a good hike anyway. The funny thing that happened was that when I returned to my car, I found that someone had decorated it with a bagel stuck on my radio antenna. (see below)

And no, I didn’t eat the bagel. (I was a little surprised that it wasn’t attacked by crows or ravens.

Bagel on Antenna

Constance Pass

View North up the Dungeness River valley

This is the view north from Constance Pass, the divide between the Dosewallips valley and (above) the Dungeness River Valley. You can just make out some of Vancouver Island around the Victoria area across the Strait of Juan De Fuca. This area is mostly in the Buckhorn Wilderness area of the Olympic National Forest, not in the Olympic National Park.

Along the ridge near Constance Pass are a couple of rock shelters (shown below). I haven’t been able to track down their origin. However, they must have provided a welcome windbreak during stormy weather.

Rock Windbreak
View over rock windbreak looking south to The Brothers.

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