Hart Lake

Hart Lake with Mt Steel in the background

Hart Lake in LaCrosse Basin is another beautiful area in the Olympic National Park that is difficult to access. It is a couple days of hiking to get there … and, of course, another couple to get back out. With a day to enjoy the area, that makes a 5 day hike at a minimum. The remoteness means fewer people … a real bonus, as far as I’m concerned.

To illustrate the difficulty in access (besides the distance), below is an image I took of the fording of the Duckabush River (it’s lots bigger by the time it reaches it’s mouth). The water is icy cold and just below this area, drops over a falls.

Fording the Duckabush RIver

High in the Olympics

High in the Olympics

While I have been posting a lot of shoreline images lately, I really prefer the high country in the Olympics. Of course, this time of year, they are totally snowed in. One must dream of summer … although even in August, there is still snow.

And, even if snow-free, this area isn’t easy to access. You need to hike at least 15 miles to get to the trailhead.

(Please note the hiker on the trail in the lower left)

Splashes of Color

Vine Maple (Red)

The previous post referred to the vine maple as the source of the brightest reds in the lowland Olympics. Here’s a good example (above) as compared to big leaf maple and its yellows (below).

Big Leaf Maple (yellow)

Hay Season

Hay Season

This is a view along the Larry Scott Trail south of Port Townsend, WA with new mown hay drying in the sun.

Hay Hay Hey Hey

Hay Hay Hey Hey is taken with my “new” Yashika Mat 124G. I had a 124G but it was stolen out of my truck back in May of 1987. I just got around to replacing it (used, of course) and this was the test roll.

It looks okay to me … Sure shows the Tri-X grain in the sky.

Woodland Trail

Woodland Trail

Walking in the late afternoon (or early morning) gives you wonderful shadows in the middle of the woods. There isn’t anything (much) I like better. I have found that I’m more cautious about walking through the shadows these days, however. The shadows can hide tripping hazards.

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