So, what is this?

So, what is this?

So, I just had to do one more scratch shot. Wondering how many can guess what it is. But then, I don’t have a good way of taking guesses … and answering, either.

It is a tube of Cadmium Yellow acrylic art paint. Taken with a Minolta bellows attachment with a macro lens, using Ektachrome 400. Scratches by means of a miniature scalpel.

Gallery Show

Death Valley Juniper

There is a local group of photographers that meet once a month for “Print Night”. Needless to say, it lost a little with the transition to Zoom-based. Just before the Covid closures, a local gallery associated with the Port Townsend School of the Arts (also a sponsor of Print Night), scheduled a month-long exhibit of the work of the Print Night participants. That got cancelled.

The show has been re-scheduled for January-February 2021 and is currently open. A total of 18 photographers submitted work. It’s a great exhibit and shows the wide range of photographic interests in our small town. When print night was ‘live’ instead of virtual, I remember often coming home so wound up with inspiration that I couldn’t sleep for hours.

The website for the show is: https://www.northwindart.org/grover-gallery

The three photos on this page are my images that they accepted. I printed them with archival materials (using my Epson P800 on Epson Hot Press Bright), Crescent Bright White mat board, Nielsen frames and museum glass. (My framing philosophy is that if it is your best work, treat it that way.) The rectangular prints are 14″ x 18″ framed to 20″ x 24″. The square is framed at 20″ x 20″.

Sun Point Snag
Tree with Roots

Ellis and Sharon

Ellis and Sharon (colored pencil)

These are the Ellis and Sharon, tugboats that were on duty for the Olympia Harbor. I occasionally do colored pencil renditions of photographs. This was one that I liked particularly well. The photo (below) was taken from my kayak.

Brusco Tugs at Port of Olympia: Ellis and Sharon

Something a little different

Flowers with filter

I had a friend share a photo or two that he took with his iPhone using a filter that was fairly well hidden in the depths of the iOS. I started playing with that and he suggested another app (Visionn) that I used to take this image of a bouquet.

This is totally different than what I have been working on, but I found it a lot of fun. More on this later …

Lost Banana Process

Bronze Banana

I spent some time at the Pratt Fine Art Foundry and I really enjoyed it. But I was drawn to the technical aspects of pouring bronze and the challenge of the “post production” work. There were times when I was just wanting to take natural objects and see what happened when you used the investment casting process. That process was typically known as “lost wax” due to the use of wax models that evaporate during the time in the kiln. One particular failure was the “lost fish process” when I tried to make a cast of a rainbow trout. There were comments that the neighborhood cats where all hanging around … but the bones all ended up in the bottom of the bronze and were just a mess.

The lost banana was much more successful.

  • Camera: Nikon D850-
  • Lens: Nikkor 58mm
  • ISO 100 2 sec f/16

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