Mt Baker

Mt Baker from the Port Townsend – Coupeville Ferry (near the Coupeville Dock)

The ferry ride to Coupeville from Port Townsend is a pleasant 35 minute trip. When the weather is clear, it is also very scenic. I like to pay the $1.80 walk-on ferry fare and ride across, walk off the ferry, pay the fare and take the return boat. There isn’t much around the Coupeville ferry dock except a boat launch and a nice park. While the park is a nice visit, it isn’t a necessity. I always hope to catch sight of some Orca on the trip across, but this day I only saw a couple of harbor seals … and that was a brief glimpse at a distance (no photo).

Mt Baker from the Port Townsend – Coupeville Ferry (in Port Townsend)

Views from the Ferry

Leaving Coupeville Dock

The ferry ride from Coupeville to Port Townsend provides some fairly dramatic scenery, from the more mudane (the ferry dock and environs) to the more spectacular view of the Northeast corner of the Olympic Mountains. The left over remnants of the morning fog reduced the clarity of the view, but added the ability to distinguish the various ridgelines.

View from the Ferry

Ferry Ride

The Salish Ferry at Coupeville Dock

My previous post showed the fog bank and shoreline, shot on the ferry from Port Townsend to Coupeville. Once at the Coupeville dock, I left the ferry and bought a return ticket, then walked back on the ferry. The trip time is about 35 minutes each way, so a pleasant excursion at reasonable cost … $1.80 round trip.

Walk-on Passengers Load First
During the Loading of Vehicles … (fewer people on deck)

Digital Pinhole

Ferry Departure, Port Townsend
Fort Worden Overlook

I recently bought a pin hole lens for my Nikon D850. It has a variety of sizes of pinholes with a ring to rotate to switch between them. (see below for a look at the lens/camera) The pinhole concept predates photography … going back for its roots to the camera obscura. One of the interesting features of pinhole photography is that the depth of field is “infinite”…. everything is ‘in focus’. Of course, the focus isn’t as sharp as one gets with a lens camera and high resolution sensor (or film). Longer exposure times are required… since the size of the opening is so small. You are effectively using a very large “f-stop”. Therefore, a tripod is necessary. The top image of the ferry is a 5 second exposure, for instance.

I had a couple of different pinhole cameras that I had made in the past. One was an assignment for my high school photography class. These days you can buy various pinhole cameras … and spend up to several hundred dollars … some are very nicely made wood boxes. With those, you use either sheet film or photo paper and then have to deal with the development, etc. Since I don’t have a darkroom, I opted for trying out the pinhole lens that was designed with the Nikon F-mount.

Because the pinhole leaves the camera interior open to the environment (even if the opening is very small), I opted to put on a UV lens just as a method of keeping out dust. What I found afterwards is that the ‘infinite depth of field’ of the pinhole means that all the dust particles on the filter are also in focus (or nearly so). Interesting learning process! So, if you look carefully at the enlarged image, you will notice all the specks of dust in the sky areas.

Nikon with pinhole lens

Alaska Sunset

Alaska Sunset

This was taken a while back when I was returning from seeing my aunt up in Haines, Alaska: from the ferry getting close to Juneau.

That’s a great ferry ride: too bad I have a negative reaction about long boat rides right now or we might plan another trip.

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