Clearing in the Sierras

Clearing in the Sierras

When a storm passes across a mountain range, it doesn’t clear off the same way it does in the low country. Clouds hang over the peaks typically for several days. This was a day after a storm crossed the Sierras and while it was sunny in the valley, it wasn’t in the high country. Folks hiking the Pacific Crest Trail would have been getting wet.

East Side of the Sierras

East Side of the Sierras

This is looking across the Owens Valley in the Big Pine area to the east side of the Sierras. This was taken from the viewpoint on the road to the Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest in the White Mountains of California.

Abandoned Homestead

Abandoned Homestead

I was driving from Susanville, CA to Klamath Falls, OR and saw this abandoned homestead off the roadway. I’m not sure if the tree is still alive, since it was early in the spring and a fairly high elevation. It is still an active cattle ranch. Hopefully, the family that homesteaded was able to continue ownership.

Badwater, Death Valley

Badwater, Death Valley

This is the lowest point in the North American continent, Badwater, Death Valley National Park at 282 ft (86m) below sea level. It was 104 degrees (40 C) when I took this photo. The white color is caused by people walking out to the actual low point in the middle of the valley. It is an alkali salt and the white color reflects the heat and makes it seem that much warmer. Not a pleasant place to spend a lot of time, but a unique experience.

The mountains across the valley include the highest point in Death Valley National Park … Telescope Peak at 11, 043 feet (3366 m). Quite a contrast in elevation in a short distance.

Rain Shower

Rain Shower

Looking east across the Owens River valley to the White Mountains, just north of Lone Pine, CA. There isn’t much rainfall in this area, and when there is rain, it often falls in isolated showers like this one. It lasted just a few minutes, but provided some needed moisture to that particular location.

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