More Olympic Mountain Views

View North from Blue Mountain

Another set of images from a recent hike in the Olympic National Park. The top image is looking north from the end of the Blue Mountain road … a short walk takes you to the summit for an unobstructed view in all directions. The top image shows the town of Sequim and the Dungeness Spit, the Strait of Juan de Fuca and some of the San Juan Islands in the distance. The bottom image shows a view from the Grand Ridge Trail running out of Deer Park.

View looking southeast from the Grand Ridge Trail

Olympic Mountain View

The view looking southeast from the road up Blue Mountain above Deer Park.

A wonderful hike runs along the Grand Ridge Trail from Deer Park towards Obstruction Point. There is some moderate elevation gain, but the trail starts at Deer Park which is in the subalpine zone, so there is no climb to “the high country”…. just a long dusty drive.

View from the Grand Ridge Trail looking southeast

Digital Pinhole

Ferry Departure, Port Townsend
Fort Worden Overlook

I recently bought a pin hole lens for my Nikon D850. It has a variety of sizes of pinholes with a ring to rotate to switch between them. (see below for a look at the lens/camera) The pinhole concept predates photography … going back for its roots to the camera obscura. One of the interesting features of pinhole photography is that the depth of field is “infinite”…. everything is ‘in focus’. Of course, the focus isn’t as sharp as one gets with a lens camera and high resolution sensor (or film). Longer exposure times are required… since the size of the opening is so small. You are effectively using a very large “f-stop”. Therefore, a tripod is necessary. The top image of the ferry is a 5 second exposure, for instance.

I had a couple of different pinhole cameras that I had made in the past. One was an assignment for my high school photography class. These days you can buy various pinhole cameras … and spend up to several hundred dollars … some are very nicely made wood boxes. With those, you use either sheet film or photo paper and then have to deal with the development, etc. Since I don’t have a darkroom, I opted for trying out the pinhole lens that was designed with the Nikon F-mount.

Because the pinhole leaves the camera interior open to the environment (even if the opening is very small), I opted to put on a UV lens just as a method of keeping out dust. What I found afterwards is that the ‘infinite depth of field’ of the pinhole means that all the dust particles on the filter are also in focus (or nearly so). Interesting learning process! So, if you look carefully at the enlarged image, you will notice all the specks of dust in the sky areas.

Nikon with pinhole lens

Evening on the Dosewallips River

Evening on the Dosewallips River

The Dosewallips River in early July is running high with snow melt in the high country. With our early hot weather, it is melting out quicker than expected … This image was shot from the Dosewallips Campground. There was a bend in the river that gave me a view up the valley some … I’m not out wading in the cold water.

Same Tree, Different View

Bristlecone View 1
Bristlecone View 2

These two images are of the same Bristlecone Pine, but just from a slightly different spot. I like them both and thought it was interesting how a slight change in shooting angle/location can change an image so much. A reminder of one of the basic rules of photography: Keep your feet moving and work the shot.

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: