Digital Pinhole

Ferry Departure, Port Townsend
Fort Worden Overlook

I recently bought a pin hole lens for my Nikon D850. It has a variety of sizes of pinholes with a ring to rotate to switch between them. (see below for a look at the lens/camera) The pinhole concept predates photography … going back for its roots to the camera obscura. One of the interesting features of pinhole photography is that the depth of field is “infinite”…. everything is ‘in focus’. Of course, the focus isn’t as sharp as one gets with a lens camera and high resolution sensor (or film). Longer exposure times are required… since the size of the opening is so small. You are effectively using a very large “f-stop”. Therefore, a tripod is necessary. The top image of the ferry is a 5 second exposure, for instance.

I had a couple of different pinhole cameras that I had made in the past. One was an assignment for my high school photography class. These days you can buy various pinhole cameras … and spend up to several hundred dollars … some are very nicely made wood boxes. With those, you use either sheet film or photo paper and then have to deal with the development, etc. Since I don’t have a darkroom, I opted for trying out the pinhole lens that was designed with the Nikon F-mount.

Because the pinhole leaves the camera interior open to the environment (even if the opening is very small), I opted to put on a UV lens just as a method of keeping out dust. What I found afterwards is that the ‘infinite depth of field’ of the pinhole means that all the dust particles on the filter are also in focus (or nearly so). Interesting learning process! So, if you look carefully at the enlarged image, you will notice all the specks of dust in the sky areas.

Nikon with pinhole lens

Stuck

Stuck with the bridge open for boat traffic
Bridge Supports

One of the drawbacks to living where I do is that it’s a long way from major shopping areas with a bridge to cross. When the bridge opens for boat traffic, it can create a huge traffic backup… especially on holiday weekends. But when the weather is nice and you have nothing else to do, it can be an interesting photo op.

Beach Walk

Beach Walk
Beach Detail

I like the panoramic format even if the subject isn’t a scenic panorama. Of course, it depends on the subject. In the top image here there are a lot of horizontally running lines … something that a panoramic crop can emphasize. In the lower image, the crop turned into a panorama when I cut away the pieces that were distracting. In this image, I liked the wet rocks just above the surf line … and the rocks in the distance become increasingly out of focus.

Points of Port Townsend

Point Wilson Lighthouse

The top image is the Point Wilson Lighthouse at Fort Worden State Park in Port Townsend, WA. The angle makes it look less like a point. The main body of Puget Sound (Admiralty Inlet) is just on the other side of the lighthouse. The hillside in the distance is on Whidbey Island.

Point Hudson from Fort Worden

Point Hudson is at the NE corner of Port Townsend, right at the end of Water Street. This was taken from up on the hill at Fort Worden just prior to the image above. You can walk the beach from one point to the other … just make sure to check the tide charts before you start!

Port Townsend Waterfront

Port Townsend Waterfront

I liked the rayed sun through the viewfinder and was pleased with the capture being close to what I saw (except for some flaring that I hadn’t noticed. The 18 rays are a result of the lens iris being a rounded 9-blade diaphragm, but I’m not sure why it doubles the count. Maybe Wikipedia will know (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diaphragm_(optics)) …

The dock in the foreground is the current Washington State Ferry terminal at Port Townsend (the other end of the route is Coupeville, Whidbey Island. In the distance is the north east corner of the Olympic Mountains.

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