Snow in the High Country

Snow in the High Country

While the low country has mostly melted out, the high country in the Olympic National Park is still carrying a lot of snow. The snowpack is above average, so hiking in the high country is not going to be accessible early in the summer (many areas probably not until mid-July).

Trail Views

N Fork Skokomish Trail 1

These photos are from the same day as my last post (River Bends). Nice day for a spring hike on the North Fork Skokomish trail in the Olympic National Park. The underbrush is still in winter mode… so you have more visibility at ground level. This section of the trail was originally a road until it was washed out about 50 years ago.

N Fork Skokomish Trail 2

River Bends

N Fork Skokomish River 1

These photos are all of the section of the N Fork Skokomish River above the Staircase Camp area in the Olympic National Park. I took them on a recent day hike up to one of my favorite sitting spots on a big rock overlooking the area around the first photo. After I finished processing the images, I realized that I had a series of river bend images. River bends are a major source of changing valley characteristics.

N Fork Skokomish River 2
N Fork Skokomish River 3

Hiking in the Fog

Ridgeline
View from the Staircase Rapids Loop Bridge

The clouds frequently hang low over the Olympic Mountains. That is true year around, but in the late autumn, it is almost perpetual. I enjoy watching the clouds move up valley and around the ridges. They add an element of mystery to the landscape. And as long as you are prepared and have good equipment, it’s a good time to enjoy the solitude of a mountain valley.

Two Views

Two Views: Across the river
Two Views: Uphill

These two images were taken the same day in the same spot, from the North Fork Skokomish trail in Olympic National Forest. This is one of my most favorite trails … an old friend that I have visited throughout the years, year-round.

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